Category Archives: General Posts

Call to action:

If you want to do something about this issue, we’d recommend calling and emailing David Alward and your local MLA. Contact info is below:

David Alward:
email: david.alward@gnb.ca

twitter: @PremierNB
facebook: facebook.com/DavidAlwardPC

phone: 506-453-2144 (Fredericton)
fax: 506-453-7407 (Fredericton)

phone: 506-325-4990 (Woodstock)
fax: 506-325-4991 (Woodstock)

List of New Brunswick MLA’s
http://app.infoaa.7700.gnb.ca/gnb/Pub/MLAReport1.asp

 

New Brunswick Legislature – March 14/2014

Chris Collins (LIB-Moncton East) brought forth our petition this morning in the New Brunswick Legislature and questioned Minister Dube on the Social Development admission policy. Minister Dube again completely ignored the real issue and deferred seniors to Home Care or Level 2 Special Care Homes. These options are great for seniors that need those services however we are specifically speaking about the 1000’s of seniors requiring Level 3 care in New Brunswick and would formerly have been classified as 3B and been able to live in 3B facilities. If these seniors do not have Alzheimers (about 90% of former 3B seniors) they are now assessed as 3A meaning their only care option is to remain in hospital until a nursing home bed becomes available. At a significantly higher cost to the province than the 3B facilities that could previously care of them.

Below is a video clip and transcript of Minister Dube being questioned:

ORAL QUESTIONS 34 QUESTIONS ORALES
March 14, 2014 Not finalized / Non finalisé le 14 mars 2014

Special Care Homes

Mr. Collins: Will the Minister of Social Development please confirm that, as a result of a policy change by the department on long-term care, only seniors diagnosed with dementia and Alzheimer’s will be eligible for subsidy in Level 3B special care homes?

Hon. Mrs. Dubé: Thank you for the question. We have done a lot for seniors, and we will continue to do a lot for seniors because they are important.

This government announced a couple of years ago that we were going to have specialized care beds for seniors who have dementia and Alzheimer’s. We are subsidizing them as well. We are helping them as well. Actually, we have announced 704 new specialized care beds for Alzheimer’s and for dementia across this province. We are on board. We are helping them, and we are creating more beds across this province, through an RFP process, I might say. We are going to continue to help those seniors. Continue reading

Being blocked, NOT “bed blockers”

Recently the Department of Social Development (DSD) has instituted a significant narrowing of seniors who are eligible to be admitted to Level 3B facilities in New Brunswick. The 3B assessment has been used in this province for almost 2 decades with excellent results and great service provided by the operators offering this service. This has always been a small scale facility (about 18 beds) with a customized care plan for each individual resident and has always been an inclusive environment. The only criteria was the care needs of the individual, never their specific medical diagnosis. DSD has now chosen to discriminate who is able to be admitted and is excluding every senior requiring a 3B level of service simply because they do not have a diagnosis of advanced dementia. These individuals who have either no dementia or not advanced enough dementia are assessed as a 3A and forced to wait in hospital beds on the nursing home wait list for the sole reason that they are cognitively well. These hospital and nursing home beds cost the province 2-3x what 3B facilities do.

These individuals have often been referred to as “bed blockers” however the actual situation is that these individuals are being blocked from admission to appropriate Level 3B care facilities hence beingblocked.com.

DSD’s “solution” to this issue is to allow individuals who have been bed blocked with a 3A assessment to enter a 3B facility only if they sign a waiver that excludes them from ever receiving a subsidy for their long term care needs for the duration of their residency. Thereby making this a service that extremely few seniors in need of this service can afford.